Why Bitcoin Matters

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Why Bitcoin Matters

Original article by Marc Andreessen

A mysterious new technology emerges, seemingly out of nowhere, but actually the result of two decades of intense research and development by nearly anonymous researchers.

Political idealists project visions of liberation and revolution onto it; establishment elites heap contempt and scorn on it.

On the other hand, technologists – nerds – are transfixed by it. They see within it enormous potential and spend their nights and weekends tinkering with it.

Eventually mainstream products, companies and industries emerge to commercialise it; its effects become profound; and later, many people wonder why its powerful promise wasn’t more obvious from the start.

What technology am I talking about? Personal computers in 1975, the Internet in 1993, and – I believe – Bitcoin in 2014.

Read the rest here ...

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Intrapreneur Warriors

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Intrapreneur Warriors

The League of Intrapreneurs: Do you work for big business? Are you responsible for launching a new initiative, product or service that is a force for good in the world? Would your colleagues describe you as a bit of a maverick, maven or misfit?

If so, you may be a social intrapreneur!

Social intrapreneurs are becoming key actors in the race towards a new kind of economy. These corporate changemakers are developing scalable solutions to some of the world’s most intractable problems ranging from health to education to environment. But contrary to social entrepreneurs, they are innovating from within some of the world’s largest companies.

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Plastic Light Bulb

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Plastic Light Bulb

Brizilian mechanic created a light bulb from old water bottles filled with bleach. 

Alfredo Moser’s cheap and environmentally friendly invention is picking up steam in developing nations around the world. The 'Moser lamp' was picked up by the Liter of Light campaign and is now brightening 140,000 homes in the Philippines.

So how does it work? Simple refraction of sunlight, explains Moser, as he fills an empty two-litre plastic bottle.

"Add two capfuls of bleach to protect the water so it doesn't turn green [with algae]. The cleaner the bottle, the better," he adds.

Wrapping his face in a cloth he makes a hole in a roof tile with a drill. Then, from the bottom upwards, he pushes the bottle into the newly-made hole.

"You fix the bottle in with polyester resin. Even when it rains, the roof never leaks - not one drop."

"An engineer came and measured the light," he says. "It depends on how strong the sun is but it's more or less 40 to 60 watts," he says.

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MineKafon by Massoud Hassani

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MineKafon by Massoud Hassani

Massoud Hassani designed and built, by hand, a wind-powered device, heavy enough to trip land mines as it rolls across the ground. He drew his inspiration from his childhood. Growing up on the outskirts of Kabul, he would play there with his younger brother with their homemade, wind powered toys. These would sometimes get lost, blown astray they would roll out into the desert landing amongst landmines, too dangerous to retrieve. These landmines often cause accidents especially among children that would play near them. 

With a successfully Kickstarter campaign, backed by over 4000 people, Massoud raised a goal of 100,000 pounds which has launched the Mine Kafon development. 

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